Last edited by Nijind
Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of influence of dietary factors in the control of gastrointestinal mucosal growth. found in the catalog.

influence of dietary factors in the control of gastrointestinal mucosal growth.

Jonathan David Pell

influence of dietary factors in the control of gastrointestinal mucosal growth.

by Jonathan David Pell

  • 333 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by University of East Anglia in Norwich .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.), University of East Anglia, School of Biological Sciences, 1993.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21847152M

  The discussion begins with an overview of the gastrointestinal tract, with emphasis on factors that affect the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa and the implications for nutrition. This book then turns to kinetic and biochemical parameters related to the development of several diseases of the gastrointestinal Edition: 1.   Food and its interactions with the immune system are a natural fit for both our specialty and the Journal: the digestion and resorption of food is the principal role of the gastrointestinal tract and the last 2 decades have witnessed a marked expansion of research into how food and nutritional elements influence health and by: 2.

The development of a healthy GI microbiota is critical to normal development and maintenance of health in the host, and an absence of the microbiota is incompatible with life 3; however, the GI microbiota changes throughout the life of an animal, depending on factors such as species, environment, and health. 3 Dietary changes can also affect the composition of the GI . Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in the United States. Lifestyle and dietary patterns influence colon cancer risk both positively and negatively. Among the dietary factors, several plant-derived compounds have been found to afford colon cancer protection. These compounds potentially influence all aspects of colonic cellular regulation and develop .

Causes include: irregular bowel habits, psychogenic factors, inactivity, chronic laxative use or abuse, obstruction, medications, and inadequate consumption of fiber and fluid. Encourage exercise and a diet high in fiber (25 g/day for women and 38 g/day for men), and promote adequate fluid intake to help alleviate symptoms. A brief evidence-based review of two gastrointestinal illnesses: irritable bowel and leaky gut syndromes. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine ; Duncan SH, et al. Reduced dietary intake of carbohydrates by obese subjects results in decreased concentrations of butyrate and butyrate-producing bacteria in feces.


Share this book
You might also like
Maintenance of Water Level in Upper Mississippi River for Wildlife Conservation Purposes

Maintenance of Water Level in Upper Mississippi River for Wildlife Conservation Purposes

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Worked Zinc and Zinc Alloys in Asia (World Trade Report)

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Worked Zinc and Zinc Alloys in Asia (World Trade Report)

Trigonometric Functions (Lifepac Math Grade 12-Trigonometry)

Trigonometric Functions (Lifepac Math Grade 12-Trigonometry)

Thermal waters of western Canada

Thermal waters of western Canada

dog beneath the skin; or, where is Francis?

dog beneath the skin; or, where is Francis?

Laboratory animal welfare. Supplement II

Laboratory animal welfare. Supplement II

Selected letters of Christopher Columbus

Selected letters of Christopher Columbus

Patients Guide to Medical Test

Patients Guide to Medical Test

Operations of Manganese-Ore-Purchasing Depots at Deming, N. Mex., and Wenden, Ariz.

Operations of Manganese-Ore-Purchasing Depots at Deming, N. Mex., and Wenden, Ariz.

Finland

Finland

Open door book ...

Open door book ...

Musical roots of the South

Musical roots of the South

Farmer Giles of Ham

Farmer Giles of Ham

Faulkner Hospital

Faulkner Hospital

Influence of dietary factors in the control of gastrointestinal mucosal growth by Jonathan David Pell Download PDF EPUB FB2

The control of the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa is unique and, compared with most other tissue in the body, complex. Mucosal growth is regulated by the same hormones that alter metabolism in other tissues, but the gastrointestinal mucosa also responds to a host of events triggered by the ingestion and presence of food within the digestive Cited by: The mammalian gastrointestinal mucosa is a rapidly self-renewing tissue in the body, and its homeostasis is preserved through the strict regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis.

The control of the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa is unique and, compared with most other tissue in the body, complex. Mucosal growth is regulated by the same hormones Cited by: Dietary factors can dramatically influence microbioma health and diversity [,], reflecting on the function of the intestinal epithelium and immune system.

Further understanding the links between diet, microbiota and the immune system will likely provide key directions for disease prevention and : Federica Francescangeli, Maria Laura De Angelis, Ann Zeuner. humoral factors in the regulation of tissue growth Download humoral factors in the regulation of tissue growth or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

Click Download or Read Online button to get humoral factors in the regulation of tissue growth book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook.

Physiology of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Sixth Edition, a Two-Volume set, covers the study of the mechanical, physical and biochemical functions of the GI Tract by linking clinical disease and disorder, thus bridging the gap between clinical and laboratory medicine while also covering breakthroughs in gastroenterology, such as the brain-gut.

Abstract:Protein is essential to growth and metabolism. Many factors influence dietary protein digestion and utilization in the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics have attracted increasing attention in recent years owing to their broad health benefits, which may include a positive influence on the digestion and utilization of by: 1.

Dietary carbohydrate intake, in particular high intake of refined sugars, has increased in recent years and is known to potentiate the effects of some environmental contaminants ().For example, organophosphates such as parathion have been used as pesticides worldwide, and their toxicity has been reported to be amplified by the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

29 Author: Brenda J. Smith, Edralin A. Lucas. This article reviews the possible mechanisms initiated by the ingestion and presence of food in the digestive tract that might regulate the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa.

Emphasis is placed on direct local nutrition, pancreatic and biliary secretions, and gastrointestinal by: components. Methods: To determine whether a physiological dose of insulin-like growth factor-1 would influence sucrase and lactase activity levels, day-old suckling rat pups were treated with an oral gavage of insulin-like growth factor Four diets differing in fat composition were fed to lactating dams.

Brush border membranes were isolated from jejunal and ileal segments of. Rats that ingested the diet containing casein with % of dietary fiber added showed a growth of % in the pancreas.

Rats fed other casein diets did not show significant differences (p > ). It is thought that a vast number of environmental risk factors may be implicated in the development of IBD, including smoking, dietary factors. The influence of dietary fibre source and level on the development of the gastrointestinal tract, digestibility and energy metabolism in broiler chickens - Volume 75 Issue 3 - Henry JøRgensen, Xin-Quan Zhao, Knud Erik Bach Knudsen, Bjørn O.

EggumCited by: The intestine comprises mucosa, submucosa, muscle layers, and serosa, as well as intestinal stem cells (ISCs) located at or near the crypt base of the mucosa [1,2,3].ISCs play an important role in the growth and the regeneration of the intestinal mucosa and the maintenance of intestinal epithelial homeostasis [4,5,6].In addition, the recovery of the intestinal mucosa after various Cited by: 1.

INTRODUCTION The gastrointestinal tract mucosa constantly confronts a variety of potentially injurious agents involving pathogenic bacteria, normal bacterial floras, and even toxic dietary factors, which usually cause infection and inflammation and have been implicated in essential barrier function failure including inflammatory bowel disease (Irvine and Marshall.

Gastrointestinal tract barrier function Professor John Pluske, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Australia The pig interfaces with its external environment at multiple sites including the mucosae of the airways, oral cavity, genitourinary tract, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

these factors has been the role of food. As a consequence, although not always evidence-based, dietary interventions are enjoying a renaissance in irritable bowel syndrome management. Notsurprisingly, given its explorationinmany disease states, the gut microbiota has also been studied in functional gastrointestinal disorders; data remain incon.

Abstract: Nutrition plays a key role in the management of gastrointestinal disease, and some patients may be managed by dietary therapy alone. Dietary ingredients can have a negative or positive effect on the bowel.

Negative factors in a diet may include toxins, allergens, toxic dietary excesses, or nutritional deficiencies. BACKGROUND/AIMS Dietary fibre influence growth and function of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This study investigates the importance of dietary fibre in intestinal growth in experimental diabetes, and correlates intestinal growth with plasma levels of the intestinotrophic factor, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2).

METHODS Male Wistar rats were randomised to the Cited by: Mucosal protection thus requires more than the simple barrier of a single layer of cells lining the entire digestive tract.

The Normal Intestinal Mucosa Gastrointestinal mucosa separating and protecting against substances passing through functions in a state of physiological inflammation.

3 This normalstate can also be described as one of. Increased dietary fiber (DF) intake elicits a wide range of physiologic effects, not just locally in the gut, but systemically.

DFs can greatly alter the gut milieu by affecting the gut microbiome, which in turn influences the gut barrier, gastrointestinal immune and endocrine responses, and nitrogen cycling and microbial metabolism.

A number of regulatory or modulating influences have been proposed in the growth of the small and large intestine during the developmental and Cited by: 8.The mucosal integrity of the gastrointestinal tract and the functioning of its accessory organs are vital in maintaining the health of your patient.

The gastrointestinal tract’s accessory organs include the liver, pancreas, and gallbladder (Scanlon, ).The gastrointestinal (GI) tumour microenvironment is characterised by its unique colonisation with bacteria that are estimated to match the total number of cells in our body.

It is becoming increasingly clear that the microbiome and its metabolites are important orchestrators of local and systemic immune responses, anticancer immunity and the host response to cancer : Silke Neumann, Estelle M. Peyroux, Matt J. Woodall, Nick J. Shields, Sarah L. Young, Sharon T.

Patti.